Dr. Hauswirth received his B.S. in chemistry from Stanford University and his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Oregon State University.
 After an NIH Fellowship in the Biochemistry Department at Johns Hopkins University, he joined that department as an assistant professor. In 1976, he joined the faculty of molecular genetics and in 1985 the Ophthalmology faculty at the University of Florida (UF). While at UF Dr. Hauswirth is responsible, in part, for determining the mechanism of replication of adeno-associated virus DNA and the discovery of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in mammals. More recently, he collaborated on the first successful rescue of a dominant genetic disease in animals (ribozyme treatment in a Retinitis Pigmentosa model
in rats) and the first restoration of vision for a recessive retinal disease (congenitally blind Briard dogs). His current interests involve the delivery and testing of potentially therapeutic genes for retinitis pigmentosa. This work has led to four gene therapy clinical trials for various genetic forms of human blindness with three more on course for initiation soon.